Defending Those Who Defend Us®
  • DoD policy requires that DNA samples be taken from service members, civilians, and contractors who are suspected of committing certain criminal offenses. These samples are forwarded to the United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL) which serves as the DoD’s Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) participating laboratory. Individuals from whom samples are taken but, Read More

    MJA is proud to announce a recent victory on behalf of our client, a Specialist in the United States Army. The client was charged at general court-martial with violating Article 120b (sexual abuse of a child) for allegedly committing a lewd act in the presence of a teenager. He was advised by military counsel, Read More

    The Last Line of Defense for Service Members Convicted of a Military Crime The presidential pardon is the last line of defense for service members convicted at general or special court-martial. After all legal appeals are final, only the presidential pardon can provide a convicted service member with meaningful relief. MJA is dedicated to, Read More

    Defending Service Members Charged with Malingering “Malingering” is the criminal offense of feigning mental or physical illness, or intentionally hurting oneself, in order to avoid military duties. While this military-specific offense may sound archaic, malingering is still prosecuted in the military and carries serious punishment. MJA has defended service members charged with the most, Read More

    Have you ever wanted to remove derogatory material from your official military record, request a medal you earned but were never awarded, or ask for a different discharge characterization of service or reenlistment code? If so, there is good news!  Each service branch maintains a Board for Correction of Military/Naval Records (BCMR/BCNR) devoted to, Read More

    MJA is proud to announce a recent victory at the Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR). Our client, a former enlisted Sailor who was discharged from the Navy in 1987 for a pattern of misconduct, spent over 30 years with an other than honorable (OTH) characterization of service on his record. After repeatedly, Read More

    Being titled in the military is as simple as being placed in the subject block of a CID, OSI, or NCIS report of investigation. When an investigation begins, the investigator on the case only needs to develop credible information that a person committed a crime. Credible information can be as little as an alleged, Read More

    On December 20, 2019, President Trump signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 which permits active duty military personnel or their authorized representative to file claims for death or personal injuries caused by the medical malpractice of a Department of Defense heath care provider. Service members have historically been, Read More

    Article 117a, UCMJ, colloquially referred to as the UCMJ’s “revenge porn” article, criminalizes the wrongful broadcast or distribution of intimate visual images. Article 117a was codified in response to the 2017 “Marines United” scandal in which nude images of female servicemembers and civilians were posted on Facebook by military members. Elements To be punishable, Read More

    People are often surprised to learn that extramarital sexual conduct, which includes “adultery”, is a crime in the military. While this military-specific offense might seem harmless enough to civilians, the military takes such conduct very seriously. Service members convicted of extramarital sexual conduct can receive a federal criminal conviction, confinement, and a punitive discharge, Read More